Riviste scientifiche

How to slash the shipping industry's enormous carbon emissions

New Scientist - Mer, 24/11/2021 - 19:00
The climate crisis means we must urgently cut the huge emissions from sea transport. Engineering tricks, cleaner fuels and a return to the age of sail could all help swab the decks clean

The visionary university solving problems that don’t exist yet

New Scientist - Mer, 24/11/2021 - 19:00
How PR-person logic is challenging the notion of time, plus motion-detecting toilets and “interactive sonification of sexual arousal”, in Feedback’s weekly round-up

Why maths should move on from the ancient Greeks

New Scientist - Mer, 24/11/2021 - 19:00
Many people experience maths anxiety and some even mention feelings of "rage and despair". One way to improve the subject's perception is by playing down the Platonists, suggests Michael Brooks

Break the Internet review: How influencers will take over the world

New Scientist - Mer, 24/11/2021 - 19:00
Don’t be too quick to write off influencers as vacuous kids, they are much more important than that, writes Olivia Yallop in her book Break the Internet: In pursuit of influence

Tech companies don’t get science fiction – and that's deeply troubling

New Scientist - Mer, 24/11/2021 - 19:00
Facebook's parent company wants to build a 'metaverse'. The fact that it doesn't grasp the name's connotations is symptomatic of a wider problem, writes Annalee Newitz

Physicists have created a new type of diamond by crushing buckyballs

New Scientist - Mer, 24/11/2021 - 17:00
A new form of diamond created in the lab is as strong as natural diamond and better able to withstand heat

North American monsoon triggered by air currents over Mexico mountains

New Scientist - Mer, 24/11/2021 - 17:00
The monsoon that hits Mexico and the south-western US every year appears to be triggered by a jet stream over the Sierra Madre Occidental mountain range

Survival of the friendliest? Why Homo sapiens outlived other humans

New Scientist - Mer, 24/11/2021 - 16:45
We once shared the planet with at least seven other types of human. Ironically, our success may have been due to our deepest vulnerability: being dependent on others

What are the four main theories of consciousness?

New Scientist - Mer, 24/11/2021 - 15:48
The idea of what constitutes consciousness is split between the functional and the experiential

Lay testing cadres and point-of-care diagnostic tests for HIV and other diseases: An essential combination in health service delivery

PLoS Medicine - Mer, 24/11/2021 - 15:00

by Zibusiso Ndlovu, Tom Ellman

Zibusiso Ndlovu and Tom Ellman discuss the potential value of task sharing in provision of testing for HIV and other infectious diseases.

Watch droplets bounce off each other as they levitate on a hot plate

New Scientist - Mer, 24/11/2021 - 11:54
A twist on the classic Leidenfrost effect sees orbs of different liquids repel each other as they float on a hot plate

Red light therapy could improve eyesight that has declined due to age

New Scientist - Mer, 24/11/2021 - 11:00
Exposure to deep red or near-infrared light can improve the function of the eye’s mitochondria, the powerhouses in cells, resulting in slight but lasting improvement to declining eyesight

Neanderthals may have grown their baby teeth faster than we do

New Scientist - Mer, 24/11/2021 - 01:01
A tooth from a Neanderthal child who lived 120,000 years ago suggests that our cousin species began cutting their baby teeth at 4 months – earlier than for the average modern human

How jellyfish control their lives

Nature - Mer, 24/11/2021 - 00:00

Nature, Published online: 24 November 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-03510-6

Transgenic jellyfish reveal how these fragile creatures get by without a brain.

Daily briefing: ‘Incident’ delays launch of the James Webb Space Telescope

Nature - Mer, 24/11/2021 - 00:00

Nature, Published online: 24 November 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-03544-w

NASA holds launch of space telescope until at least 22 December after spacecraft gets jiggled. Plus, how record wildfires are harming human health, and how dogs became humans’ best friends.

Reply to: Spatial scale and the synchrony of ecological disruption

Nature - Mer, 24/11/2021 - 00:00

Nature, Published online: 24 November 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03760-4

Reply to: Spatial scale and the synchrony of ecological disruption

Spatial scale and the synchrony of ecological disruption

Nature - Mer, 24/11/2021 - 00:00

Nature, Published online: 24 November 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03759-x

Spatial scale and the synchrony of ecological disruption

Neutron beam sheds light on medieval faith and superstition

Nature - Mer, 24/11/2021 - 00:00

Nature, Published online: 24 November 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-03505-3

Hidden inside a leaden amulet, researchers find words of magic and Christian creed side by side.

The surgical solution to congenital heart defects

Nature - Mer, 24/11/2021 - 00:00

Nature, Published online: 24 November 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-03517-z

Some babies are born with hearts that have missing or malformed parts. A series of delicate operations can fix the damage and extend the lives of these children.

Tidings from an exploding star make astronomers happy

Nature - Mer, 24/11/2021 - 00:00

Nature, Published online: 24 November 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-03508-0

Herculean stellar event provides scientific clues to how stars die.