Riviste scientifiche

[Articles] A comparison of two hybrid closed-loop systems in adolescents and young adults with type 1 diabetes (FLAIR): a multicentre, randomised, crossover trial

The Lancet - Sab, 16/01/2021 - 00:00
Hyperglycaemia was reduced without increasing hypoglycaemia in adolescents and young adults with type 1 diabetes using the investigational advanced hybrid closed-loop system compared with the commercially available MiniMed 670G system. Testing an advanced hybrid closed-loop system in populations that are underserved due to socioeconomic factors and testing during pregnancy and in individuals with impaired awareness of hypoglycaemia would advance the effective use of this technology

[Clinical Picture] Bitot's spots, dry eyes, and night blindness indicate vitamin A deficiency

The Lancet - Sab, 16/01/2021 - 00:00
A 26-year-old woman presented to our hospital with a 6-month history of dry, itchy eyes, and poor vision at night. She also reported dry, itchy skin, and brittle nails.

We must start publishing ethnicity data for covid-19 vaccinations

New Scientist - Ven, 15/01/2021 - 18:20
The race to vaccinate as many people as possible against covid-19 is under way, but unless countries track who receives the vaccine we won’t be able to ensure the benefits are spread equitably, says Layal Liverpool

Covid-19 news: UK bans travel from South America over new variant

New Scientist - Ven, 15/01/2021 - 17:16
The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic

Dinosaur found in Argentina may be largest land animal ever

New Scientist - Ven, 15/01/2021 - 17:11
Fossils of a gigantic dinosaur are emerging from the ground in Argentina after 98 million years – and the creature may be the largest land animal that scientists have ever found

The impact of a routine late third trimester growth scan on the incidence, diagnosis, and management of breech presentation in Oxfordshire, UK: A cohort study

PLoS Medicine - Ven, 15/01/2021 - 15:00

by Ibtisam Salim, Eleonora Staines-Urias, Sam Mathewlynn, Lior Drukker, Manu Vatish, Lawrence Impey

Background

Breech presentation at term contributes significantly to cesarean section (CS) rates worldwide. External cephalic version (ECV) is a safe procedure that reduces term breech presentation and associated CS. A principal barrier to ECV is failure to diagnose breech presentation. Failure to diagnose breech presentation also leads to emergency CS or unplanned vaginal breech birth. Recent evidence suggests that undiagnosed breech might be eliminated using a third trimester scan. Our aim was to evaluate the impact of introducing a routine 36-week scan on the incidence of breech presentation and of undiagnosed breech presentation.

Methods and findings

We carried out a population-based cohort study of pregnant women in a single unit covering Oxfordshire, United Kingdom. All women delivering between 37+0 and 42+6 weeks gestational age, with a singleton, nonanomalous fetus over a 4-year period (01 October 2014 to 30 September 2018) were included. The mean maternal age was 31 years, mean BMI 26, 44% were nulliparous, and 21% were of non-white ethnicity. Comparisons between the 2 years before and after introduction of routine 36-week scan were made for 2 primary outcomes of (1) the incidence of breech presentation and (2) undiagnosed breech presentation. Secondary outcomes related to ECV, mode of birth, and perinatal outcomes. Relative risks (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) are reported. A total of 27,825 pregnancies were analysed (14,444 before and 13,381 after). A scan after 35+0 weeks was performed in 5,578 (38.6%) before, and 13,251 (99.0%) after (p < 0.001). The incidence of breech presentation at birth did not change significantly (2.6% and 2.7%) (RR 1.02; 95% CI 0.89, 1.18; p = 0.76). The rate of undiagnosed breech before labour reduced, from 22.3% to 4.7% (RR 0.21; 95% CI 0.12, 0.36; p < 0.001). Vaginal breech birth rates fell from 10.3% to 5.3% (RR 0.51; 95% CI 0.30, 0.87; p = 0.01); nonsignificant increases in elective CS rates and decreases in emergency CS rates for breech babies were seen. Neonatal outcomes were not significantly altered. Study limitations include insufficient numbers to detect serious adverse outcomes, that we cannot exclude secular changes over time which may have influenced our results, and that these findings are most applicable where a comprehensive ECV service exists.

Conclusions

In this study, a universal 36-week scan policy was associated with a reduction in the incidence but not elimination of undiagnosed term breech presentation. There was no reduction in the incidence of breech presentation at birth, despite a comprehensive ECV service.

Quantum internet signals beamed between drones a kilometre apart

New Scientist - Ven, 15/01/2021 - 13:38
Entangled photons have been beamed between drones and to a ground station, creating technology that could form part of an unhackable quantum internet

NASA gives up trying to burrow under Mars surface with 'mole' probe

New Scientist - Ven, 15/01/2021 - 11:35
For nearly two years, a heat probe attached to NASA’s InSight lander, nicknamed the mole, has been trying to burrow into the Martian surface – but now researchers have thrown in the towel

Author Correction: Suppression of a SARS-CoV-2 outbreak in the Italian municipality of Vo’

Nature - Ven, 15/01/2021 - 00:00

Nature, Published online: 15 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2956-7

Author Correction: Suppression of a SARS-CoV-2 outbreak in the Italian municipality of Vo’

Tiny hard drives that are alive — and multiplying

Nature - Ven, 15/01/2021 - 00:00

Nature, Published online: 15 January 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00092-1

A common bacterium can be engineered to carry coded messages in its genome.

A case of ‘stomach flu’ arms the microbiome against invaders

Nature - Ven, 15/01/2021 - 00:00

Nature, Published online: 15 January 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00078-z

Gut-wrenching infection encourages production of an amino acid consumed by helpful bacteria.

Feeling fit? A little more sweat could still help your heart

Nature - Ven, 15/01/2021 - 00:00

Nature, Published online: 15 January 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00093-0

Data from nearly 100,000 people find no upper limit to the heart benefits of increasing exercise levels.

Publisher Correction: Unveiling the strong interaction among hadrons at the LHC

Nature - Ven, 15/01/2021 - 00:00

Nature, Published online: 15 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-03142-2

Publisher Correction: Unveiling the strong interaction among hadrons at the LHC

<i>Science</i> family of journals announces change to open-access policy

Nature - Ven, 15/01/2021 - 00:00

Nature, Published online: 15 January 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00103-1

Subscription journals will let some Plan S funded researchers share accepted manuscripts under open licences.

‘Can you work with less-qualified people?’ and 19 other curveball questions to navigate at industry interviews

Nature - Ven, 15/01/2021 - 00:00

Nature, Published online: 15 January 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00042-x

Be ready for queries that reflect stereotypes about academia and that probe why you’re switching sectors, says Tina Persson.

China COVID vaccine reports mixed results — what does that mean for the pandemic?

Nature - Ven, 15/01/2021 - 00:00

Nature, Published online: 15 January 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00094-z

Scientists say CoronaVac could reduce cases of severe disease, particularly in countries with raging outbreaks.

Coronavirus diaries: making plans in a changing world

Nature - Ven, 15/01/2021 - 00:00

Nature, Published online: 15 January 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00106-y

John Tregoning grapples with a shifting schedule and a new UK lockdown.

‘A bloody mess’: Confusion reigns over naming of new COVID variants

Nature - Ven, 15/01/2021 - 00:00

Nature, Published online: 15 January 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00097-w

As more lineages emerge, researchers are struggling with a patchwork of nomenclature.

COVID curbed carbon emissions in 2020 — but not by much

Nature - Ven, 15/01/2021 - 00:00

Nature, Published online: 15 January 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00090-3

Despite sharp drops early in the pandemic, global emissions of carbon dioxide picked up in the second half of the year, new data show.

Daily briefing: Underwhelming trial results for leading Chinese COVID vaccine

Nature - Ven, 15/01/2021 - 00:00

Nature, Published online: 15 January 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00114-y

The CoronaVac vaccine, developed by Sinovac in China, reports mixed results in Brazil. Plus, what we know about COVID’s toll on smell and taste, and the mysterious extinction of the dire wolf.